Global Health Systems

The analysis of different national models of health systems and how they measure up in achieving equitable access to health care and improving health outcomes. 

Comparison of Site of Death, Health Care Utilization, and Hospital Expenditures for Patients Dying With Cancer in 7 Developed Countries

Feb. 17, 2016

Justin Bekelman, Scott Halpern, Carl Rudolf Blankart, Julie Bynum, Joachim Cohen, Robert Fowler, Stein Kaasa, Lukas Kwietniewski, Hans Olav Melberg, Bregie Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Mariska Oosterveld-Vulg, Andrew Pring, Joans Schreyogg, Connie Ulrich...

In The Journal of the American Medical Association, Justin Bekelman and colleagues, including Scott Halpern, Connie Ulrich and Ezekiel Emanuel compare site of death, health care utilization and hospital expenditures in 7 countries: Belgium, Canada, England, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and the United States. Using administrative and registry data, the researchers measured deaths in acute care hospital, along with inpatient and outpatient measures, and hospital expenditures paid by insurers. They find that a smaller proportion of decedents, older than 65, died in acute...

Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

Jan. 29, 2016

Hayley Germack, Peter Griffiths, Douglas Sloane, Anne Marie Rafferty, Jane Ball, Linda Aiken

In BMJ Open, Hayley Germack and colleagues, including Linda Aiken, examine the association between patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England and the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. The authors used data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. They found a significant association between the percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside care and patient satisfaction; hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses had lower...

“Science has delivered solutions. The question for the world is: When will we put it into practice?”

Aug. 9, 2015

In the mid-eighties, I coordinated a medical genetics clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital. We shared our outpatient unit, the Moore Clinic, with the AIDS Care Program, which began in 1984. Every week, I would see the devastating and shockingly rapid decline of robust young men—men my age—in the waiting room outside my office. I came to recognize the pattern:  two men would walk in, one weaker, one stronger.

Primary Care Shortages: More Than a Head Count

Research Brief
Nov. 21, 2014

The existence of a primary care physician shortage, even prior to the ACA, is not universally accepted. A new report by the Institute on Medicine found “no credible evidence” that the nation faces a looming physician shortage in primary care specialties. There is greater consensus about a maldistribution of physicians, in terms of specialty, geography, and practice settings.