Molly Candon, PhD

Ending the Opioid and Overdose Crisis

Mar. 30, 2021

The pandemic has worsened an existing drug overdose crisis that claimed the lives of more than 81,000 people in the U.S. from May 2019-June 2020. As the Biden-Harris administration firms up and implements its proposed response to the opioid epidemic, this brief provides evidence-based recommendations to consider.


We focus our recommendations on the evidence and our experience in three areas: reducing the demand for opioids through policies that increase access to prevention, treatment, and recovery services; reducing the harms from opioid use through strategies that reduce morbidity and mortality; and reducing the supply of opioids through opioid stewardship that limits prescribing by the medical community and promotes adequate pain management. We also address the accountability of the pharmaceutical industry in contributing to the crisis and recommend ways to target settlement funds for maximal impact on the communities most affected.

Fast-tracking Behavioral Health Care

Sep. 17, 2019

Imagine struggling with a behavioral health issue, searching for a local psychiatrist, and finding out the provider you’ve chosen doesn’t accept insurance. You wouldn’t be alone: most psychiatrists in the United States don’t. But let’s say your plan has some out-of-network benefits, which means you pay the full cost up front and request an itemized receipt for every appointment.

Research and Shiny Objects: Tips to Gain Media Attention

Nov. 2, 2017

A study doesn’t end with publishing its findings— for its impact to be fully realized, the findings must be disseminated. Even when research is adequately publicized, excessive jargon can prevent lay readers from understanding what it means. Since the clarity of scientific abstracts is declining over time, academics must go beyond publication to make their work accessible. One way to surmount the information barriers is to collaborate with journalists, who can help translate our research into action.