Health Care Delivery: Commentary

Q & A with Economist Martin Gaynor

Apr. 19, 2016

Martin Gaynor, PhD recently visited Penn and presented his new paper, “The Price Ain’t Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured” (co-authored by Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, and John Van Reenen). The national study was the first to analyze health care spending and hospital transaction prices among the privately insured—an analysis made possible by the availability of data from three of the largest private insurers in the U.S.

Educating Health Professionals on Social Determinants of Health

Apr. 6, 2016

Health professionals are ill-prepared to address social factors that contribute to poor health, because these factors often lie beyond the scope of medical education. But just as addressing social determinants of health (SDH) involves stretching beyond traditional medical practices, educating health professionals involves stretching beyond traditional medical education.

Retainer-Based Medicine: Where is the Research?

Feb. 8, 2016

About 10 years ago, my primary care physician decided that she would no longer take insurance, and left the practice.  Patients could pay directly to continue in her care in her new practice, or see another physician in the existing practice.  I chose to stay in the practice with another physician.

Can Social Impact Bonds Deliver For Health?

Nov. 5, 2015

Social impact bonds (SIBs), also known as "pay for success financing," are a relatively new way to attract private investment in public goods and social programs. The potential to draw new revenue streams that can fund programs with significant upfront costs but long-term savings has made these bonds attractive in the health care sector.

Physician Incentives - Making Performance Measures Meaningful

Oct. 30, 2015

How can we redesign physician incentives to improve their impact on behavior and performance?  Recently, the Commonwealth Fund published a round-up of expert views on reforming physician incentives, and one of the experts was LDI Senior Fellow Amol Navathe, MD, PhD. Navathe, a physician, health economist, and engineer, studies how to apply behavioral economic principles to physician financial and non-financial incentives.

Reducing ED Use in Medicaid Patients

Jun. 18, 2015

In a new NEJM Perspective, LDI Fellow Ari Friedman, Brendan Saloner, and Renee Hsia analyze different policies to reduce emergency department (ED) use in Medicaid patients. They advocate strongly for providing Medicaid patients with better alternatives to the ED, rather than discouraging nonemergency ED use by imposing steep copayments.

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