Healthy Behaviors: Commentary

The First Digital Pill: Innovation or Invasion?

Nov. 20, 2017

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the first digital pill that tracks if patients have taken their medication. Our experts weighed in on the potential benefits of the new technology, as well as the potential for abuse.

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Effect of a Game-Based Intervention Designed to Enhance Social Incentives to Increase Physical Activity Among Families: The BE FIT Randomized Clinical Trial

Nov. 8, 2017

Mitesh S. Patel, Emelia J. Benjamin, Kevin G. Volpp, Caroline S. Fox, ...

In JAMA Internal Medicine, Mitesh Patel and colleagues, including Kevin Volpp and Dylan Small, tested the effectiveness of a gamification intervention designed using insights from behavioral economics to increase physical activity. The researchers piloted the Behavioral Economics Framingham Incentive Trial (BE FIT), a randomized clinical trial with a 12-week intervention period and a 12-week follow-up period, among 200 adults (comprising 94 families) enrolled in the Framingham Heart Study.

All participants received daily feedback on whether or not they had achieved their...

Coercion or Caring: The Fundamental Paradox for Adherence Interventions for HIV+ People With Mental Illness

Jul. 3, 2017

Marlene M. Eisenberg, Michael Hennessy, Donna Coviello, Nancy Hanrahan, Michael B. Blank

In AIDS and Behavior, Marlene Eisenberg and colleagues, including Nancy Hanrahan and Michael Blank, examine if a high-intensity HIV-treatment intervention would be perceived as coercive by HIV-positive individuals with serious mental illness. Previous research has shown that potentially coercive mandates during the earliest stages of mental health treatment are associated with later treatment benefits. Furthermore, the prevalence of HIV is significantly higher among populations with mental illness. The authors developed an HIV management regimen that utilized advance practice...

Will Decision Aids Save Money?

Jun. 28, 2017

Where you end up may depend on where you start. That’s the perspective taken by LDI Senior Fellow Said Ibrahim in the New England Journal of Medicine, as he discusses how shared decision-making tools and increased patient knowledge affect treatment choice. Specifically, Ibrahim looks at elective joint replacement, and examines how increased use of decision aids affects the choice to pursue either conservative management or total joint replacement.

Effect of message congruency on attention and recall in pictorial health warning labels

Jun. 19, 2017

Kristen Lochbuehler, Melissa Mercincavage, Kathy Z. Tang, C Dana Tomlin, Joseph N. Cappella, Andrew A. Strasser

In Tobacco Control, Kristen Lochbuehler and colleagues, including Joseph Cappella, investigate the effect of pictorial health warning label congruency on smokers’ attention and recall of label content. Daily smokers were randomly assigned to view pictorial warning labels (PWLs) where the label’s image and text were either congruent or incongruent in their theme. Participants had their eye movements tracked, and were asked to recall the label content both immediately after exposure and five days later. The authors find that those who viewed PWLs of a congruent theme spent less time...

Why Shopping for Health Care is Hard

Jul. 8, 2016

[cross-posted from the Health Cents blog on Philly.com]

As health care costs increase, consumers are being asked to manage more of their own health care spending.  One of the most common ways this is happening is through high deductible health insurance plans. 

The Murky Benefits of Price Transparency

May. 6, 2016

Price transparency—the ability to know the price of something before buying—is a mainstay of most markets. It has been touted as a way to reduce health care spending by enabling a new breed of cost-conscious consumers to comparison shop for care. A new JAMA study suggests that it might not be that simple.

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