Mild Non-Dementia Cognitive Decline Makes Elderly Vulnerable to Widespread Financial Fraud

Mild Non-Dementia Cognitive Decline Makes Elderly Vulnerable to Widespread Financial Fraud

Jason Karlawish on Elder Fraud

The mild cognitive decline experienced by many older persons who do not have dementia make those elderly individuals vulnerable to financial fraud and subsequent financial disaster, Penn Medicine's Jason Karlawish emphasized in a Philadelphia Inquirer article.

Karlawish, MD, is a Professor of Medicine at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine, Director of the Penn Neurodegenerative Disease Ethics and Policy Program, Associate Director of the Penn Memory Center, and an LDI Senior Fellow.

The article chronicled Karlawish's presentation at a Penn conference on decision-making and the elderly. He pointed out that poor financial decision-making can also be an early sign of the onset of dementia and emphasized that the problem of elder fraud is far larger than the country's current ability to police or address in an effective manner.