Research Publications

Screening for Intimate Partner Violence in a Pediatric ED: A Quality Improvement Initiative

Mar. 6, 2020

Christina Mancheno, Brenna Aumaier, Ashlee Murray

Abstract [from journal]

Objective: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a serious public health concern and impacts the entire family unit, particularly children. We implemented an IPV screening and referral program in an urban pediatric emergency department (ED) and aimed to screen 30% of patient families for IPV by January 1, 2017.

Methods: We used a quality improvement initiative using a nonverbal screening card to screen families when the caregiver was the sole adult present and spoke English and/or Spanish, and the patient was

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Parent Moral Distress in Serious Pediatric Illness: A Dimensional Analysis

Connie M. Ulrich, PhD, RN, FAAN
Mar. 5, 2020

Kim Mooney-Doyle, Connie M. Ulrich

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Moral distress is an important and well-studied phenomenon among nurses and other healthcare providers, yet the conceptualization of parental moral distress remains unclear.

Objective: The objective of this dimensional analysis was to describe the nature of family moral distress in serious pediatric illness.

Design and Methods: A dimensional analysis of articles retrieved from a librarian-assisted systematic review of Scopus, CINAHL, and PsychInfo was conducted, focusing on

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Vaccine Exemption Requirements and Parental Vaccine Attitudes: An Online Experiment

Mar. 4, 2020

Alison M. Buttenheim, Caroline M. Joyce, José Ibarra, Jessica Agas, Kristen Feemster, Lori K. Handy, Avnika B. Amin, Saad B. Omer

Abstract [from journal]

Increases in vaccine hesitancy and vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks have focused attention on state laws governing school-entry vaccine mandates and the allowable exemptions (medical and nonmedical) from those mandates. There is substantial variation in the type of exemptions available in each state, and states with more rigorous or burdensome exemption requirements generally have lower exemption rates. States have little evidence, however, about how vaccine-hesitant parents respond to different requirements. Despite recent efforts to formulate "

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Agreement and Accuracy of Medication Persistence Identified by Patient Self-report vs Pharmacy Fill: A Secondary Analysis of the Cluster Randomized ARTEMIS Trial

Mar. 4, 2020

Alexander C. Fanaroff, Eric D. Peterson, Lisa A. Kaltenbach, Christopher P. Cannon, Niteesh K. Choudhry, Timothy D. Henry, Kevin J. Anstrom, David J. Cohen, Eileen Fonseca, Naeem D. Khan, Gregg C. Fonarow, Tracy Y. Wang

Abstract [from journal]

Importance: Pharmacy fill data are increasingly accessible to clinicians and researchers to evaluate longitudinal medication persistence beyond patient self-report.

Objective: To assess the agreement and accuracy of patient-reported and pharmacy fill-based medication persistence.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This post hoc analysis of the cluster randomized clinical trial ARTEMIS (Affordability and Real-world Antiplatelet Treatment Effectiveness After Myocardial Infarction Study)

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Nerve Block Use after Hip Fracture Versus Elective Hip or Knee Arthroplasty: Retrospective Analysis

Meghan Lane-Fall, MD, MSHP
Mar. 3, 2020

Mark D. Neuman, Nabil M. Elkassabany, Jason Ochroch, Craig Newcomb, Colleen Brensinger, Samir Mehta, Lakisha J. Gaskins, Meghan B. Lane‐Fall
 

Abstract [from journal]

Objectives: Although peripheral nerve blocks are associated with improved pain control and end outcomes among older adults with hip fracture, their current utilization among US hip fracture patients is not well understood. We characterized contemporary use of peripheral nerve blocks after hip fracture over time and identified predictors of nerve block receipt.

Design: Retrospective cohort study of claims data from one large national private US insurer.

Setting: US acute care hospitals.

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Understanding Geographic Variation in Systemic Overuse Among the Privately Insured

Mar. 1, 2020

Allison H. Oakes, Aditi Sen, Jodi B. Segal 

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Medical care overuse is a significant source of patient harm and wasteful spending. Understanding the drivers of overuse is essential to the design of effective interventions.

Objective: We tested the association between structural factors of the health care delivery system and regional differences systemic overuse.

Research Design: We conducted a retrospective analysis of deidentified claims for 18- to 64-year-old adults from the IBM MarketScan Commercial Claims and

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Beyond Band-Aids for Bullet Holes: Firearm Violence As a Public Health Priority

Mar. 1, 2020

Elinore J. KaufmanTherese S. Richmond

Abstract [from journal]

Objectives: To review the public health approach to preventing and treating firearm violence.

Data Sources: Peer-reviewed, published scholarship and federal data systems.

Study Selection: English-language, indexed research articles on the epidemiology, risk, prevention, and consequences of firearm violence.

Data Extraction: This narrative review includes findings related to the epidemiology and impact of firearm violence, focusing on short- and long-term outcomes

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Applying Behavioral Economics to Enhance Safe Firearm Storage

Mar. 1, 2020

Katelin Hoskins, Unmesha Roy Paladhi, Caitlin McDonaldAlison Buttenheim

Abstract [from journal]

Behavioral economics applies key principles from psychology and economics to address obstacles to behavior change. The important topic of pediatric firearm injuries has not yet been explored through a behavioral economic lens. Pediatric firearm-related injuries are a significant public health problem in the United States. Despite American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines advising that firearms be stored unloaded, in a locked box or with a locking device, and separate from ammunition, estimates suggest that ∼4.6 million children live in homes with at

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Promoting Reproducible Research for Characterizing Nonmedical Use of Medications Through Data Annotation: Description of a Twitter Corpus and Guidelines

Feb. 26, 2020

Karen O'Connor, Abeed Sarker, Jeanmarie Perrone, Graciela Gonzalez Hernandez

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Social media data are being increasingly used for population-level health research because it provides near real-time access to large volumes of consumer-generated data. Recently, a number of studies have explored the possibility of using social media data, such as from Twitter, for monitoring prescription medication abuse. However, there is a paucity of annotated data or guidelines for data characterization that discuss how information related to abuse-prone medications is presented on Twitter.

Objective:

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Quantifying Gender Disparity in Physician Authorship Among Commentary Articles in Three High-Impact Medical Journals: An Observational Study

Jaya Aysola, MD, MPH
Feb. 25, 2020

Mira Mamtani, Frances Shofer, Anita Mudan, Utsha Khatri, Rachael Walker, Jeanmarie Perrone, Jaya Aysola

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Scholarship plays a direct role in career advancement, promotion and authoritative recognition, and women physicians remain under-represented as authors of original research articles.

Objective: We sought to determine if women physician authors are similarly under-represented in commentary articles within high-impact journals.

Design/Setting/Participants: In this observational study, we abstracted and analysed author information (gender and degree) and authorship position

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Firearm Laws and Illegal Firearm Flow between US States

Elinore Kaufman, U of Penn
Feb. 24, 2020

Erin G. Andrade, Mark H. Hoofnagle, Elinore Kaufman, Mark J. Seamon, Adam Pah, Christopher N. Morrison

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Considerable variation in firearm legislation exists. Prior studies show an association between stronger state laws and fewer firearm deaths. We hypothesized that firearms would flow from states with weaker laws to states with stronger laws based on proximity and population.

Methods: Crime gun trace data from 2015-2017 was accessed from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and compared to the count and composition of firearm legislation in 2015 among the contiguous 48 states

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A Quasi-Experiment Assessing the Six-Months Effects of a Nurse Care Coordination Program on Patient Care Experiences and Clinician Teamwork in Community Health Centers

Ingrid Nembhard, PhD
Feb. 24, 2020

Ingrid M. Nembhard, Eugenia Buta, Yuna S. H. Lee, Daren Anderson, Ianita Zlateva, Paul D. Cleary

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Recognition that coordination among healthcare providers is associated with better quality of care and lower costs has increased interest in interventions designed to improve care coordination. One intervention is to add care coordination to nurses' role in a formal way. Little is known about effects of this approach, which tends to be pursued by small organizations and those in lower-resource settings. We assessed effects of this approach on care experiences of high-risk patients (those most in need of care coordination)

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System-Level Improvements in Work Environments Lead to Lower Nurse Burnout and Higher Patient Satisfaction

Linda Aiken honored by Irish Surgeons
Feb. 24, 2020

Margo Brooks Carthon, Linda Hatfield, Heather Brom, Mary Houton, Erin Kelly-Hellyer, Amelia Schlak, Linda H. Aiken

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Abstract [from journal]

Background: Burnout among nurses is associated with lower patient satisfaction, yet few system-level solutions have been identified to improve outcomes.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between nurse burnout and patient satisfaction and determine whether work environments are associated with these outcomes.

Methods: This study was a cross-sectional analysis of 463 hospitals in 4 states. Burnout was defined using the

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Pain Catastrophizing as a Predictor of Suicidal Ideation in Chronic Pain Patients with an Opiate Prescription

Feb. 21, 2020

Lily A. Brown, Kevin G. Lynch, Martin Cheatle

Abstract [from journal]

Chronic pain and opioid use are associated with increased risk for suicidal ideation and behaviors (SIB) in cross-sectional studies, particularly among individuals who catastrophize about their pain. This study examined the longitudinal association between two styles of pain coping, catastrophizing and hoping/praying, as predictors of subsequent SIB, as well as possible mediators of this association among patients with chronic pain receiving long-term opioid therapy. Participants (n = 496) were adults with chronic nonmalignant pain on long-term opioid

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Drug Enforcement Agency 2014 Hydrocodone Rescheduling Rule and Opioid Dispensing After Surgery

Feb. 19, 2020

Mark D. Neuman, Sean Hennessy, Dylan S. Small, Craig Newcomb, Lakisha J. Gaskins, Colleen M. Brensinger, Duminda N. Wijeysundera, Brian T. Bateman, Hannah Wunsch

Abstract [from journal]

Background: In 2014, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency reclassified hydrocodone from Schedule III to Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act, resulting in new restrictions on refills. The authors hypothesized that hydrocodone rescheduling led to decreases in total opioid dispensing within 30 days of surgery and reduced new long-term opioid dispensing among surgical patients.

Methods: The authors studied privately insured, opioid-naïve adults undergoing 10 general or orthopedic surgeries between 2011 and

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