Penn SUMR Scholars and Karabots Junior Fellows Collaborate at College of Physicians

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Penn SUMR Scholars and Karabots Junior Fellows Collaborate at College of Physicians

Both Academic Pipeline Programs Focus on Minority Health Care Issues
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Each year, the University of Pennsylvania's LDI Summer Undergraduate Minority Research (SUMR) scholars and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia's Karabots Junior Fellows meet for a day to discuss issues and potential careers in health care. The SUMR students are college undergrads and the Karabots students are high school students from underrepresented communities. The programs of both groups immerse them in health care-related experiences and curricula aimed at preparing them for further studies in the field. The College also houses the internationally famed Mütter Museum established in the pre-Civil War era to house specimens used as a visual teaching aids for 19th-century medical students.
Photos published with permission, College of Physicians of Philadelphia
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(Above, left) The day engages both groups with each other, shown here in a meeting in the College's great hall.
(Above, right) (l to r) Karabots Junior Fellow Kai'el King of the William L. Sayre High School; LDI SUMR Scholar William Okrafo-Smart of Pennsylvania State University; and Karabots Junior Fellow Chaka Matthews of the Paul Robeson High School for Human Services discuss current events in health.
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(Above, left) SUMR Scholars Caleb Diaz of Penn and Cindy Le of Rutgers University talk with Karabots Junior Fellow Abdol-Samad Ali of Boys' Latin Charter School.
(Above, right) SUMR Scholar Andrew Ng of Penn's Dental School laughs with Karabots Junior Fellow Kasai Lamartiniere of the Science Leadership Academy at Beeber.
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(Above, left) In the 1800s, when science-based medical concepts were just beginning to coalesce and none of today's mass communications systems existed, physical museums functioned like three dimensional text books that medical students could walk through. The Mütter is one of the few such facilities that has survived from that era and its collections document the knowledge and practices of the time -- some of which seem quite strange today.
(Above, right) Many of the items, like the heads and torso section in glass above are sculpted from wax and were designed to enable students to see what some conditions -- like the two facial cancers shown here -- actually looked like. Thousands of other items in the collection are actual body parts stored in formaldehyde or otherwise preserved for long-term display.
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(Above, left) Originally collected for a study of the variation in cranial anatomy of European Caucasians in the mid 19th century, the Hyrtl Skull Collection is the single most stunning visual of the museum -- an entire wall stacked with skulls.
(Above, right) SUMR Scholars Mara Abera of Penn and Tamunobelebra Igoni of Huston-Tillotson University explore the display that is the subject of a "Save Our Skulls" fund raiser to conserve and remount the specimens.
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(Above, left) Karabots Junior Fellows Wayne Cooper of Imhotep Institute Charter and Imahnee Mount of the Kimmel Performing Arts String Theory School explain the giants and dwarfs exhibit to LDI SUMR Scholars Robin Wang of Cornell University, Andrew Ng of Penn's Dental School and Haley Morin of Penn's Nursing School.
(Above, right) Exploring the display of a 9-foot-long colon that contained 40 pounds of fecal matter when it was removed from an enormously obese circus sideshow performer in the 19th century are SUMR Scholars (l to r) Cindy Le of Rutgers, Evanie Anglade of Penn, Haley Morin of Penn's Nursing School, Robin Wang of Cornell and Andrew Ng of Penn's Dental School.
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(Above, left) Gathered at the Siamese Twins exhibit to begin their day as docents are Karabots Junior Scholars (top row) Robert Melton of John Bartram High, Chaka Matthews of the Paul Robeson High School for Human Services, and Robert Taylor of William L. Sayre High. (Lower row) Annamaria "Bella" Nastasi of the Science Leadership Academy at Beeber, and Yazmeen Robinson of Preparatory Charter School.
(Above, right) LDI SUMR Scholar William Okrafo-Smart of Pennsylvania State University takes in a skeleton exhibit.
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(Above, left) Kai'el King of William L. Sayre High discusses her career aspirations with LDI Deputy Director and Founding Director of the SUMR Program Joanne Levy.
(Above, right) LDI SUMR Program Coordinator Safa Browne at the "Price of Beauty" display that details the anatomical damage and adverse health effects caused by 19th century corsets.
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(Above, left) LDI SUMR Scholar Tamunobelebra Igoni of Huston-Tillotson University toured a somewhat shocking Teratology exhibit that details both the 19th-century study of birth defects and the association of congenital abnormalities to earlier ages' myths about fantastical creatures and monsters.
(Above, right) In another of the galleries that once served as visual encyclopedias for 19th-century medical students is SUMR Scholar Arantza Rodriguez of Penn and her friend Jorge Escribano of the University of Texas at San Antonio.
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(Above, left) Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva, a rare disease that involves the out-of-control growth of bones that ultimately fuse together like an internal carapace. Here at a display of one of the most studied victims of the disease, Harry Eastlack, are (l to r) SUMR Program Coordinator Safa Browne, SUMR Scholar Evanie Anglade of Penn, Karabots Junior Fellow Maisha Menefee of Central High, SUMR scholars Eashan Kumar of Indiana University and Helen Fetaw of Penn, Karabots Junior Fellows Jurnee Jenkins of Simon Gratz Mastery Charter School and Martha Victoria of the Carver High School of Engineering and Science, and SUMR Scholar Cindy Le of Rutgers.
(Above, right) SUMR Scholar Arrix Ryce of the University of Miami was fascinated by the "Tsantsa" or shrunken head exhibit. The heads were collected for study from South American tribes early in the 20th century. Those native groups originally shrunk the heads of their wartime enemies as trophies and ritual objects. By the 19th century, they were also making them as commercial products sold to well-heeled Victorian tourists and collectors.
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The Penn SUMR Scholars and the Karabots Junior Fellows gather for a group photo on the main stairway of the Philadelphia College of Physicians building.