Does access to gynecologic oncologists or medical oncologists affect outcomes for advanced gynecologic cancers? Impact of provider specialty on survival outcomes, health care utilization, and spending.

Pilot Project

Does access to gynecologic oncologists or medical oncologists affect outcomes for advanced gynecologic cancers? Impact of provider specialty on survival outcomes, health care utilization, and spending.

Abstract: The aim of the proposed pilot study is to examine the impact of provider specialty on health care utilization and spending for women with advanced gynecologic cancers. Currently, women with advanced gynecologic cancer may receive chemotherapy from one of two specialty providers, gynecologic oncologists or medical oncologists, due to geographic-based availability of providers, health insurer network coverage, or other patient, provider, and systems factors. While these patients may all be undergoing chemotherapy treatment for the same indications, the delivery of care by these two different specialty providers may impact cancer outcomes, utilization and spending. This study will evaluate whether provider subspecialty affects outcomes related to chemotherapy treatment in women with advanced gynecologic cancer, a medically complex, elderly adult population. Information gathered from this study will be used to obtain federal funding for future investigations regarding provider access and impact of payment reform on women with gynecologic cancers.