Burnout, Job Dissatisfaction and Missed Care among Maternity Nurses

Abstract [from journal]

Aim: This study examined the prevalence of job dissatisfaction and burnout among maternity nurses and the association of job dissatisfaction and burnout with missed care.

Background: Nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction affect the quality and safety of care and are amenable to intervention. Little is known about job dissatisfaction and burnout among maternity nurses or how these factors are associated with missed care in maternity units.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the 2015 RN4CAST survey data and the American Hospital Association's 2015 Annual Survey. Robust logistic regression models at the nurse level examined the association of job dissatisfaction and burnout with missed care.

Results: One-quarter of nurses screened positive for burnout and almost one-fifth reported job dissatisfaction. While 56.4% of nurses in the total sample reported any missed care, 72.6% of nurses with job dissatisfaction and 84.5% of nurses with burnout reported any missed care (P < 0.001).

Conclusions: The association of job dissatisfaction and burnout, which are modifiable states, with increased rates of missed maternity care suggests that addressing job dissatisfaction and burnout may improve care quality. Implications for Nursing Management Job dissatisfaction, burnout, and missed care may decrease with an improved work environment.