Accountable Care Organizations

A group of doctors, hospitals and other health care providers collectively responsible for, and accountable for, quality and total per capita costs across the continuum of care for a patient population.  

Effect of Hospital and Post-Acute Care Provider Participation in Accountable Care Organizations on Patient Outcomes and Medicare Spending

Aug. 9, 2018

Divyansh Agarwal and Rachel M. Werner

Abstract [from journal]

Objective: To test for differences in patient outcomes when hospital and post‐acute care (PAC) providers participate in accountable care organizations (ACOs).

Data/Setting: Using Medicare claims, we examined changes in readmission, Medicare spending, and length of stay among patients admitted to ACO‐participating hospitals and PAC providers.

Design: We compared changes in outcomes

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Do Changes in Post-Acute Care Use at Hospitals Participating in an Accountable Care Organization Spillover to All Medicare Beneficiaries?

Mar. 22, 2018

Amol S. Navathe, Alexander M. Bain, Rachel M. Werner

Abtract [from journal]

Background
While early evidence suggests that Medicare accountable care organizations (ACOs) may reduce post-acute care (PAC) utilization for attributed beneficiaries, whether these effects spill over to all beneficiaries admitted to hospitals participating in ACOs stray is unknown.

Objective
The objective of this study was to evaluate whether changes in PAC use and Medicare spending spill over to all beneficiaries admitted to hospitals participating in the Medicare

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Value Based Payment: Is This Time Actually Different?

Mar. 8, 2018

Practice transformation and payment reform are defining features of contemporary health policy debates. The story goes like this: new provider organizations, such as Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) are transforming care delivery from fragmented and volume driven to integrated and optimized for quality; meanwhile, innovative payment models, such as bundled payments and risk-based contracting, herald a national transition from fee-for-service (FFS) to value-based payments.

The “value” of value in gynecologic oncology practice in the United States: Society of Gynecologic Oncology evidence-based review and recommendations

Jun. 20, 2017

David E. Cohn, Emily Ko, Larissa A. Meyer, Jason D. Wright, Sarah M. Temkin, Jonathan Foote, Nathaniel L. Jones, Laura J. Havrilesky

In Gynecologic Oncology, David Cohn and colleagues, including Emily Ko, examine trends in gynecologic oncology health care expenditures, and assess how costs may be affected by new models of health care delivery and payment. The authors conduct a review on behalf of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, and discuss the financial burden of increasing co-payments for cancer patients. They emphasize the need for gynecologic oncology practitioners to prepare for new models of cancer care delivery, such as Oncology Patient-Centered Medical Homes (OCPHM), as well as newer pay for...

Issues at the Heart of Advancing the De-Adoption of Low-Value Care

Issue Brief
Apr. 18, 2017

A diverse set of national leaders and stakeholders representing industry, think-tanks, provider and patient groups, and academic experts discussed how health systems, payers, and providers can spur the ‘de-adoption’ of medical practices and technologies no longer considered valuable.

Effects of the ACA on Health Care Cost Containment

Issue Brief
Mar. 2, 2017

This brief reviews the evidence on how key ACA provisions have affected the growth of health care costs. Coverage expansions produced a predictable jump in health care spending, amidst a slowdown that began a decade ago. Although we have not returned to the double-digit increases of the past, the authors find little evidence that ACA cost containment provisions produced changes necessary to “bend the cost curve.” Cost control will likely play a prominent role in the next round of health reform and will be critical to sustaining coverage gains in the long term.

Physicians’ Participation In ACOs Is Lower In Places With Vulnerable Populations Than In More Affluent Communities

Research Brief
Aug. 8, 2016

Early evidence suggests that accountable care organizations (ACOs) - networks of doctors and hospitals whose members share responsibility for providing coordinated care to patients - improve health care quality and constrain costs. ACOs are increasingly common in the U.S., both for Medicare and commercially insured patients. However, there are concerns that ACOs may worsen existing disparities in health care quality if disadvantaged patients have less access to physicians who participate in them. Does physicians’ ACO participation relate to the sociodemographic characteristics of their patient population, and if so, why?

Medicare, Medicaid and the Leonard Davis Institute - Intertwined Legacies

Jul. 24, 2015

Fifty years ago, on July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed Medicare and Medicaid into law. Over the next two years, more than 29 million people gained health coverage through these programs. By 1967, as Alice Rivlin recalls, economists were sounding an alarm about rising Medicare costs and reporting to the President that projected growth would be unsustainable.

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