Delivery Innovation

The search for new and innovative ways to deliver health care more efficiently and effectively. 

Effect of Electronic Reminders, Financial Incentives, and Social Support on Outcomes After Myocardial Infarction

Jun. 30, 2017

Kevin G. Volpp, Andrea B. Troxel, Shivan J. Mehta, Laurie Norton, Jingsan Zhu, Raymond Lim, Wenli Wang, Noora Marcus, Christian Terwiesch, Kristen Caldarella, Tova Levin, Mike Relish, Nathan Negin, Aaron Smith-...

In JAMA Internal Medicine, Kevin Volpp and colleagues, including Shivan Mehta, Christian Terwiesch, Kristen Caldarella, and David Asch, investigate whether medication reminders, as well as financial and social support, delay re-hospitalization for a vascular event. The authors randomized participants to either a usual care group (the control), or to an intervention using electronic pill bottles, lottery incentives, and social support for medication adherence. The primary measured outcome of this study was time to first vascular-related re-hospitalization or death, but the authors...

Paying Research Participants: Regulatory Uncertainty, Conceptual Confusion, and a Path Forward

Jun. 29, 2017

Emily A. Largent, Holly Fernandez Lynch

In the Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law, and Ethics, Emily Largent and Holly Fernandez Lynch examine the implications of offering payment to individuals in exchange for their participation in clinical research, which is a widespread and longstanding practice.  Nevertheless, such payment remains the source of substantial debate, in particular about whether or the extent to which offers of payment coerce and/or unduly induce individuals to participate.  Yet, the various laws, regulations, and ethical guidelines that govern the conduct of human subjects research offer relatively...

Financial Incentives for Adherence to Hepatitis C Virus Clinical Care and Treatment: A Randomized Trial of Two Strategies

Jun. 29, 2017

David A. Wohl, Andrew G. Allmon, Donna Evon, Christopher Hurt, Sarah Ailleen Reifeis, Harsha Thirumurthy, Becky Straub, Angela Edwards, Katie R. Mollan

In Open Forum Infectious Diseases, David Wohl and colleagues, including Harsha Thirumurthy, assess the feasibility of two strategies for financially incentivizing adherence to Hepatitis C (HCV) care among patients with substance use disorders. Previous research has shown that, although rates of a sustained response to the virus (SVR) surpass 90%, patients experiencing substance use disorders may struggle to adhere to HCV care. The authors randomly assigned participants to either a fixed or lottery-based monetary incentive for attending clinic appointments, adhering to medications...

Association of Provider Specialty and Multidisciplinary Care With Hepatocellular Carcinoma Treatment and Mortality

Jun. 28, 2017

Marina Serper, Tamar H. Taddei, Rajni Mehta, Kathryn D'Addeo, Feng Dei, Ayse Ayatman, Michelle Baytarian, Rena Fox, Kristel Hunt, David S. Goldberg, Adriana Valderrama

In Gastroenterology, Marina Serper and colleagues, including David Goldberg, assess how various health care system factors affect survival rates in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These factors included uptake of historically underutilized curative therapies, access to a hepatologist, and presentation of the case to a multidisciplinary tumor board. The authors found that, while curative treatments of HCC increased survival rates, only 25% of newly diagnosed HCC patients received treatment intended to cure the disease. Additionally, those who received care from only...

Economic Feasibility of Staffing the Intensive Care Unit with a Communication Facilitator

Jun. 27, 2017

Nita Khandelwal, David Benkeser, Norma B. Coe, Ruth A. Engelberg, and J. Randall Curtis

In Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Nita Khandelwal and colleagues, including Norma Coe, assess the economic feasibility of staffing intensive care units (ICUs) with a communication facilitator. This person assists families in complex decision-making, improves patient-provider communication, and ensures that care is consistent with patient values and goals. The authors conducted a randomized trial with an ICU communication facilitator, and also looked at financial hospital records. Units that had a facilitator saw significantly reduced daily average ICU costs, and maximal...

Sustained improvement in intraoperative efficiency following implementation of a dedicated surgical team for pediatric spine fusion surgery

Jun. 22, 2017

Wallis Muhly, John McCloskey, Jeff Feldman, Barbara Dezayas, Michael Blum, Blair Kraus, Vaidehi Mehta, Devika Singh, Ron Keren, John Flynn

In Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management, Wallis Muhly, Ron Keren, and colleagues assess if dedicated surgical teams can improve and sustain intraoperative efficiency for pediatric posterior spine fusion (PSF). The authors compared OR efficiency data and total time spent in the OR before and after adoption of a dedicated surgical team model. The quality improvement model including developing a multidisciplinary team of surgeons, anesthesiologists nurses, and technicians, structuring weekly team meetings to understand and map the OR process, and identifying areas where...

Economic evaluation of a behavioral intervention versus brief advice for substance use treatment in pregnant women: results from a randomized controlled trial

Jun. 22, 2017

Xiao Xu, Kimberly A. Yonkers, and Jennifer Prah Ruger

In BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Xiao Xu and colleagues, including Jennifer Ruger, assess the economic impact of motivational enhancement therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy (MET-CBT) among substance-using pregnant women. The study was performed alongside a clinical trial that compared the intervention to brief advice about the risks of substance use and found no significant differences in the outcomes such as drug and alcohol use. As such, the authors conducted a cost minimization analysis, from the perspective of the health system. They found that, while the intervention...

The “value” of value in gynecologic oncology practice in the United States: Society of Gynecologic Oncology evidence-based review and recommendations

Jun. 20, 2017

David E. Cohn, Emily Ko, Larissa A. Meyer, Jason D. Wright, Sarah M. Temkin, Jonathan Foote, Nathaniel L. Jones, Laura J. Havrilesky

In Gynecologic Oncology, David Cohn and colleagues, including Emily Ko, examine trends in gynecologic oncology health care expenditures, and assess how costs may be affected by new models of health care delivery and payment. The authors conduct a review on behalf of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, and discuss the financial burden of increasing co-payments for cancer patients. They emphasize the need for gynecologic oncology practitioners to prepare for new models of cancer care delivery, such as Oncology Patient-Centered Medical Homes (OCPHM), as well as newer pay for...

Defining Value in Radiation Oncology: Approaches to Weighing Benefits vs. Costs

Jun. 20, 2017

Andre Konski

In Oncology, Andre Konski considers health care payment models and the transition from fee-for-service to value-based payment as it applies to radiation oncology. Konski examines difficulties in determining value, pointing out that both patients and payers could be considered health care ‘customers’ . He assesses how traditional cost-effective analyses may not be suitable for novel radiation oncology therapies, especially as consumers are increasingly conscious of the costs of treatment plans. He argues that radiation oncologists must consider the cost to patients when designing...

Evaluating the Impact of the Laborist Model of Obstetric Care on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

Research Brief
Apr. 26, 2017

Implementation of the laborist model was associated with a 15% decrease in the odds of the induction of labor and a 17% decrease in the odds of preterm birth.

Issues at the Heart of Advancing the De-Adoption of Low-Value Care

Issue Brief
Apr. 18, 2017

A diverse set of national leaders and stakeholders representing industry, think-tanks, provider and patient groups, and academic experts discussed how health systems, payers, and providers can spur the ‘de-adoption’ of medical practices and technologies no longer considered valuable.

Using Active Choice Within the Electronic Health Record to Increase Influenza Vaccination Rates

Apr. 1, 2017

Mitesh S. Patel, Kevin G. Volpp, Dylan S. Small, Craig Wynn, Jingsan Zhu, Lin Yang, Steven Honeywell Jr., Susan C. Day

In the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Mitesh Patel and colleagues, including Kevin Volpp ​and Dylan Small, evaluate the association between an active choice intervention in the electronic health record and changes in influenza vaccination rates. Despite the benefits of influenza vaccination, each year more than half of adults in the U.S. do not receive it. In this study, the “active choice intervention” was a best practice alert in the electronic health record system, which prompted the provider to actively “accept” or “cancel” an order for the influenza vaccine. The study...

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