Delivery Innovation

The search for new and innovative ways to deliver health care more efficiently and effectively. 

Sustained improvement in intraoperative efficiency following implementation of a dedicated surgical team for pediatric spine fusion surgery

Jun. 22, 2017

Wallis Muhly, John McCloskey, Jeff Feldman, Barbara Dezayas, Michael Blum, Blair Kraus, Vaidehi Mehta, Devika Singh, Ron Keren, John Flynn

In Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management, Wallis Muhly, Ron Keren, and colleagues assess if dedicated surgical teams can improve and sustain intraoperative efficiency for pediatric posterior spine fusion (PSF). The authors compared OR efficiency data and total time spent in the OR before and after adoption of a dedicated surgical team model. The quality improvement model including developing a multidisciplinary team of surgeons, anesthesiologists nurses, and technicians, structuring weekly team meetings to understand and map the OR process, and identifying areas where...

Economic evaluation of a behavioral intervention versus brief advice for substance use treatment in pregnant women: results from a randomized controlled trial

Jun. 22, 2017

Xiao Xu, Kimberly A. Yonkers, and Jennifer Prah Ruger

In BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, Xiao Xu and colleagues, including Jennifer Ruger, assess the economic impact of motivational enhancement therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy (MET-CBT) among substance-using pregnant women. The study was performed alongside a clinical trial that compared the intervention to brief advice about the risks of substance use and found no significant differences in the outcomes such as drug and alcohol use. As such, the authors conducted a cost minimization analysis, from the perspective of the health system. They found that, while the intervention...

The “value” of value in gynecologic oncology practice in the United States: Society of Gynecologic Oncology evidence-based review and recommendations

Jun. 20, 2017

David E. Cohn, Emily Ko, Larissa A. Meyer, Jason D. Wright, Sarah M. Temkin, Jonathan Foote, Nathaniel L. Jones, Laura J. Havrilesky

In Gynecologic Oncology, David Cohn and colleagues, including Emily Ko, examine trends in gynecologic oncology health care expenditures, and assess how costs may be affected by new models of health care delivery and payment. The authors conduct a review on behalf of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, and discuss the financial burden of increasing co-payments for cancer patients. They emphasize the need for gynecologic oncology practitioners to prepare for new models of cancer care delivery, such as Oncology Patient-Centered Medical Homes (OCPHM), as well as newer pay for...

Defining Value in Radiation Oncology: Approaches to Weighing Benefits vs. Costs

Jun. 20, 2017

Andre Konski

In Oncology, Andre Konski considers health care payment models and the transition from fee-for-service to value-based payment as it applies to radiation oncology. Konski examines difficulties in determining value, pointing out that both patients and payers could be considered health care ‘customers’ . He assesses how traditional cost-effective analyses may not be suitable for novel radiation oncology therapies, especially as consumers are increasingly conscious of the costs of treatment plans. He argues that radiation oncologists must consider the cost to patients when designing...

Evaluating the Impact of the Laborist Model of Obstetric Care on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

Research Brief
Apr. 26, 2017

Implementation of the laborist model was associated with a 15% decrease in the odds of the induction of labor and a 17% decrease in the odds of preterm birth.

Issues at the Heart of Advancing the De-Adoption of Low-Value Care

Issue Brief
Apr. 18, 2017

A diverse set of national leaders and stakeholders representing industry, think-tanks, provider and patient groups, and academic experts discussed how health systems, payers, and providers can spur the ‘de-adoption’ of medical practices and technologies no longer considered valuable.

Using Active Choice Within the Electronic Health Record to Increase Influenza Vaccination Rates

Apr. 1, 2017

Mitesh S. Patel, Kevin G. Volpp, Dylan S. Small, Craig Wynn, Jingsan Zhu, Lin Yang, Steven Honeywell Jr., Susan C. Day

In the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Mitesh Patel and colleagues, including Kevin Volpp ​and Dylan Small, evaluate the association between an active choice intervention in the electronic health record and changes in influenza vaccination rates. Despite the benefits of influenza vaccination, each year more than half of adults in the U.S. do not receive it. In this study, the “active choice intervention” was a best practice alert in the electronic health record system, which prompted the provider to actively “accept” or “cancel” an order for the influenza vaccine. The study...

Giving Patients a Ride: a Tricky Legal Line

Mar. 23, 2017

What if health systems provided rides for elderly patients with limited transportation options or poor patients unable to access public transportation? We might applaud them for a creative strategy to improve access for vulnerable populations. However, their actions might be illegal.

Effects of the ACA on Health Care Cost Containment

Issue Brief
Mar. 2, 2017

This brief reviews the evidence on how key ACA provisions have affected the growth of health care costs. Coverage expansions produced a predictable jump in health care spending, amidst a slowdown that began a decade ago. Although we have not returned to the double-digit increases of the past, the authors find little evidence that ACA cost containment provisions produced changes necessary to “bend the cost curve.” Cost control will likely play a prominent role in the next round of health reform and will be critical to sustaining coverage gains in the long term.

43 Ways to Leave Your Technology

Feb. 14, 2017

We recently convened an expert roundtable to tackle how health systems, payers, and providers can spur the ‘de-adoption’ of medical practices and technologies no longer considered valuable. This got us thinking - while the process by which ineffective practices or technologies are abandoned is neither simple nor automatic, even the language used to describe it is not clear. And language matters. It often reflects an unstated focus on one mechanism or one level of decision-making. Here we review, and potentially clarify, the terminology.

The Emerging Market of Smartphone-Integrated Infant Physiologic Monitors

Jan. 27, 2017

Christopher P. Bonafide,  David T. Jamison,  Elizabeth E. Foglia, 

In a JAMA Viewpoint, Christopher Bonafide and colleagues discuss the efficacy and safety of smartphone apps integrated with sensors that monitor infants’ vital signs. While the performance characteristics of these sensors are unknown to the public and the regulations around them are scarce, their sales have skyrocketed, reaching 40,000 units for a single brand of “smart sock” monitors. These companies use direct-to-parent advertising to portray their products as necessary to alert parents when something is wrong with their infants’ cardiorespiratory health, even though there are...

Pages