Health Insurance

Financial and structural characteristics of the public and private programs that cover medical costs. LDI analyzes how to expand and improve coverage through insurance exchanges, employer-sponsored insurance, and public programs.

Five-Year Cost of Dementia: Medicare

Research Brief
Apr. 29, 2019

[dropcap]A[/dropcap]bout 5.5 million older adults are living with dementia, a chronic, progressive disease characterized by severe cognitive decline. This number will likely grow significantly as the U.S. population ages, which has cost implications for the Medicare program. A full accounting of these additional expenses will help policymakers plan for them in their Medicare budgets. In this study, Norma Coe and colleagues examined survival and Medicare expenditures in older adults with and without dementia to estimate dementia’s incremental costs to Medicare in the five years after diagnosis.

The Burden of Health Care Costs for Working Families

Issue Brief
Apr. 1, 2019

Growing concern about the affordability of health care and the cost burden imposed on working families frequently appears in public debate about the next phase of health care reform. In this second brief of our affordability series, Penn LDI and United States of Care adapt a national-level affordability index to provide state-level data on the cost burden faced by working families who have employer-sponsored insurance (ESI). We examine how this burden varies across states, and how it has changed within states from 2010 to 2016.

How Do Consumers Respond to Surprise Medical Bills?

Mar. 4, 2019

Today, you often hear stories of patients who visit an in-network hospital and still receive a large medical bill because one or more providers involved in their care was out-of-network. Although this phenomenon of “surprise billing” has become common, no research has examined how consumers respond to surprise bills and alter their health-seeking behavior.

Consumers' Responses to Surprise Medical Bills in Elective Situations

Research Brief
Mar. 4, 2019

A surprise medical bill is a bill from an out-of-network provider that was not expected by or not chosen by the patient.To see whether consumers are more likely to switch hospitals after receiving a surprise bill, Benjamin Chartock and Sarah Schutz, and their co-author Christopher Garmon, analyzed nationwide employer-sponsored health insurance claims for labor and delivery services. Mothers who received a surprise out-of-network bill for their first delivery had 13% greater odds of switching hospitals for their second delivery compared to those who did not get a surprise bill.

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