Organization of Healthcare Delivery

Streamlining how health care is delivered in the U.S.’s fragmented system.

THRIVE: Addressing Patients’ Social Needs after Hospitalization

Jul. 30, 2019

Imagine being discharged from the hospital to a two-room apartment badly in need of repair. Your electricity has been cut off and you can barely remember the discharge instructions. You were told to see a specialist in a week, but it will take you 90 minutes one-way on public transportation to get there. Confused about follow-up and juggling the complexities of life, what do you do?

A Methodology For Studying Organizational Performance: A Multistate Survey of Front-line Providers

Jul. 3, 2019

Karen Lasater, Olga Jarrín, Linda Aiken, Matthew McHugh, Douglas Sloane, Herbert Smith 

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Rigorous measurement of organizational performance requires large, unbiased samples to allow inferences to the population. Studies of organizations, including hospitals, often rely on voluntary surveys subject to nonresponse bias. For example, hospital administrators with concerns about performance are more likely to opt-out of surveys about organizational quality and safety, which is problematic for generating inferences.

Objective: The objective of this study was to describe a novel approach to...

Do Cardiac Centers of Excellence Really Excel?

May. 20, 2019

If I needed a cardiac procedure, I might look for a hospital designated as a cardiac “center of excellence” (COE) by my insurer. I might assume that the hospital delivers higher quality care and achieves better outcomes than other hospitals. But that assumption might be wrong, according to a new study by LDI Associate Fellow Sameed Khatana and colleagues in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Five-Year Cost of Dementia: Medicare

Research Brief
Apr. 29, 2019

[dropcap]A[/dropcap]bout 5.5 million older adults are living with dementia, a chronic, progressive disease characterized by severe cognitive decline. This number will likely grow significantly as the U.S. population ages, which has cost implications for the Medicare program. A full accounting of these additional expenses will help policymakers plan for them in their Medicare budgets. In this study, Norma Coe and colleagues examined survival and Medicare expenditures in older adults with and without dementia to estimate dementia’s incremental costs to Medicare in the five years after diagnosis.

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