Private Insurance/Exchanges

The main source of health insurance in the US, primarily through employers. The Affordable Care Act established health insurance exchanges (marketplaces) for the individual and small group market.

Essential Health Benefits: 50-State Variations on a Theme

Data Brief
Oct. 22, 2014

All qualified health plans under the Affordable Care Act must cover a package of essential health benefits (EHBs) equal in scope to a typical employer plan. The law laid out 10 general categories of services that EHBs must cover, but did not itemize those services. Each state is allowed to identify an existing plan as a benchmark for these EHBs. The result of this policy is that EHBs vary from state to state, often because of a legacy of different state-mandated benefits (such as treatments for autism, infertility, or temporomandibular joint disorders). 

Storified! Health Care Reform in 2015

Oct. 11, 2014
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We've gathered a collection of live tweets from our joint PennLDI-Wharton Public Policy Institute event held October 9.  Three panels of researchers and policymakers shared results and insights about how the research could help improve implementation of health care reform. 

Sit back, read more, and enjoy the story!

How Did Rural Residents Fare on the Health Insurance Marketplaces?

Data Brief
Aug. 29, 2014

How are rural areas faring with the Affordable Care Act? Has the law fostered competition among plans or have one or two insurers dominated? This Data Brief examines 2014 premiums and finds that residents of rural counties, as a whole, did not face higher premiums than residents of urban counties. However, states with largely rural populations do face fewer choices and higher premiums. These are the states to watch as new issuers enter the marketplaces and 2015 premiums are filed.

Photo Page: SUMR14 at The Morris Arboretum

Jul. 31, 2014
Photography by Hoag Levins and Megan Pellegrino [Click images for larger] Lounging in the 50-foot-high nets (above left) that provide a bird's eye view of a heavily wooded section of the Morris Arboretum are Summer Undergraduate Minority Research (SUMR) scholars Sarah Appeadu, Nehanda Khemet, Karena Taylor, Shamarlon Yates, Siya Ndwandwe and Tyler Chavez. Above right, Arboretum guide Jim Diamond explains the Katsura tree, a 90-foot high, 67-foot wide botanical behemoth imported from Japan in the early 1900s. Originally created in the 1880s for the personal pleasure of two heirs to a...

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