Rubbing Elbows With America's Top Health Services Researchers

SUMR Blog

Rubbing Elbows With America's Top Health Services Researchers

SUMR Scholars at Academy Health 2015 Expo and Poster Hall
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[Click images for larger] The annual AcademyHealth Research Meeting offers Penn's Summer Undergraduate Minority Research (SUMR) Scholars a rare opportunity to meet and mingle with top experts from the national health care services and policy research community. At the Sunday Lunch Plenary in the Minneapolis Convention Center, 18 SUMR Scholars filled two tables (above, left). Left to right are Kelly McClure of Cornell University; Enrique Torres Hernandez of St. Mary's University; Omar Mansour of Macalester College; Mei-Lynn Hua of the University of Texas at Austin; Yasmeen Wermers of Emory University; John Gehlbach of Penn; Tammy Jiang of Brown University; Tobi Akindoju of Yale; Shanarra Turner of the University of Michigan; and Cristal Lopez of California State University at San Marcos. Above, right AcademyHealth President Lisa Simpson addresses the plenary session, welcoming nearly 3,000 attendees to the annual event.
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At another table in the Plenary session are SUMR Scholars (above, left) Brandon McKenzie of Swarthmore College; Rishhab Kumar of Penn; and Rathnam Venkat of Penn. At the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics (LDI) table in the Expo Hall after the Plenary are (above, right) Mei-Lynn Hua, Rathnam Venkat, Jerome Watts of Haverford College, Tobi Akindoju, Omar Mansour, and Sharonya Vadakattu of Penn.
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This view (above, left) shows just one corner of the sprawling Expo Hall in the Minneapolis Convention Center. Above, right, SUMR Scholars Omar Mansour and Tammy Jiang arrive to begin touring the 70 booths of exhibitors ranging from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Harvard University.
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Above, left, Tobi Akindoju engages in discussions at the RAND Health booth. Above, right, Yasmeen Wermers, Enrique Torres Hernandez and Mei-Lynn Hua meet with a Harvard representative.
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SUMR Program Director Joanne Levy (above, left) is a cross between mother hen and a drill sergeant as she shepherds the SUMR students toward direct engagement with the many professional organizations as well as with the nationaly renowned researchers the students heard from the stage earlier in the day. Also on hand to assist the SUMR students with their assignments to write articles about the AcademyHealth sessions they found most interesting (above, right) are LDI Health Policy Specialist Rebecka Rosenquist and Associate Director for Health Policy Janet Weiner.
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In the Expo Hall's poster session, SUMR Scholar Adjoa Mante (above, left) chats with Donald Warne, MD, MPH, of North Dakota State University about his recent studies of health disparities among Native American tribes. Warne, Director of NDSU's Master of Public Health Program, is also a member of the Oglala Lakota tribe in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. Above, right: SUMR Scholars Brandon McKenzie and Rathnam Venkat chat with poster presenter Robert Lieberthal, PhD, Assistant Professor at the Thomas Jefferson University School of Population Health in Philadelphia.
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Above, left: Reading through the poster detailing Florida State University School of Public Health's study of chronic conditions and disparities in prenatal care utilization are SUMR Scholars Tobi Akindoju and Jerome Watts. During three days of poster sessions, scholars also had the opportunity to meet and chat with some of the two dozen experts from Penn who were displaying posters of their latest work. One of those was (above, right) Jeffrey Silber, MD, PhD, is Professor of both Pediatrics, Anesthesiology and Critical Care at Penn's Perelman School of Medicine, and Health Care Management at the Wharton School; and Director of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Center for Outcomes Research. His latest study analyzed patient outcomes in hospitals with good nurse-to-bed ratios vs. hospitals with poorly rated nurse-to-bed ratios.