Organization of Healthcare Delivery

Streamlining how health care is delivered in the U.S.’s fragmented system.

Geographic Variation in Postpartum Prescription Opioid Use: Opportunities to Improve Maternal Safety

Jun. 6, 2018

Nora V. Becker, Karen J.Gibbins, Jeanmarie Perrone, Brandon C. Maughan

Abstract [from journal]

Background: Obstetric delivery is among the most common in-hospital procedures experienced by reproductive-age women, yet there is little literature on patterns of postpartum opioid prescriptions after such episodes.

Methods: We used claims data from 871,195 vaginal deliveries to 768,455 privately-insured women with an in-hospital delivery between June 2001 and July 2013 to examine the state- and census division-level proportions of women who

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The Effect of Workforce Assignment on Performance: Evidence from Home Health Care

Research Brief
May. 22, 2018

In this study of more than 43,000 home health episodes following a hospitalization, handoffs between skilled nursing providers—a marker of discontinuity of care—substantially increased hospital readmissions, and were more detrimental for sicker patients. The estimates imply that a single handoff increases the likelihood of 30-day hospital readmission by 16% and that one in four hospitalizations during home health care could be avoided if handoffs were eliminated.

Understanding Pediatric Caretakers’ Views On Obtaining Medical Care for Low‐Acuity Illness

May. 17, 2018

Whitney V. Cabey, Judy A. Shea, Shreya Kangovi, Danielle Kennedy, Chiamaka Onwuzulike, Joel Fein
 

Abstract [from journal]

Background: A significant proportion of low acuity emergency department (ED) visits are by patients under 18 years of age. Results from prior interventions designed to reduce low acuity pediatric ED use have been mixed or poorly sustained, perhaps because they were not informed by patient and caretakers’ perspectives. The objective of this study was to explore caretaker decision‐making processes, values and priorities when deciding to seek care.

Methods

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Preventable Hospitalizations, Barriers to Care, and Disability

May. 17, 2018

Liliana E. Pezzin, Hillary R. Bogner, Jibby E. Kurichi, Pui L. Kwong, Joel E. Streim, Dawei Xie, Ling Na, Sean Hennessy

Abstract [from journal]

The AHRQ's Prevention Quality Indicators assume inpatient hospitalizations for certain conditions, referred as ambulatory-care sensitive (ACS) conditions, are potentially preventable and may indicate reduced access to and a lower quality of ambulatory care. Using a cohort drawn from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) linked to Medicare claims, we examined the extent to which barriers to healthcare are associated with ACS hospitalizations and related costs, and whether these associations differ by beneficiaries' disability status. Our results...

Organizational Processes and Patient Experiences in the Patient-Centered Medical Home

May. 10, 2018

Abstract [from journal]

Background: There is increasing emphasis on the use of patient-reported experience data to assess practice performance, particularly in the setting of patient-centered medical homes. Yet we lack understanding of what organizational processes relate to patient experiences.

Objective: Examine associations between organizational processes practices adopt to become PCMH and patient experiences with care.

Research Design: We analyzed visit data from patients (n=8356) at adult primary care practices...

Best Practices for Reducing Unplanned Acute Care for Patients with Cancer

Research Brief
May. 3, 2018

Reducing preventable and unplanned emergency department visits and hospitalizations is a major challenge in cancer care. In this review of best practices and supporting evidence, the authors identified five strategies that health systems and cancer programs can use to reduce acute care: (1) identify patients at high risk of unplanned acute care; (2) enhance access and care coordination; (3) standardize clinical pathways for symptom management; (4) develop new sites for urgent cancer care, and; (5) use early palliative care. 

Where Patients Go After Hospital Discharge: Trends in Post-Acute Care

Apr. 17, 2018

As the largest single source of health care spending, hospitals have drawn considerable attention from policymakers. Efforts to reduce costs have led to decreased lengths of hospital stays, but far less attention has been paid to where those patients go immediately after discharge. Medicare payment reforms implemented in the wake of the Affordable Care Act, such as hospital readmissions penalties and bundled payments, have made hospitals accountable for care beyond their walls, including institutional post-acute care.

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