Graham E. Quinn, MD

Graham E. Quinn, MD

quinn@email.chop.edu

Emeritus Director of Research, Pediatric Ophthalmology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Dr. Quinn received his medical degree from Duke University School of Medicine in 1973. He completed an internship in internal medicine and a year of pathology residency at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland before moving to Philadelphia to complete his residency in ophthalmology at Penn. He did his fellowship training at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and stayed on as a member of the faculty in the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Quinn completed the Master of Clinical Epidemiology degree in the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently Professor emeritus in the Department of Ophthalmology. Dr. Quinn's interest areas are retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and visual and ocular development in children. He was a principal investigator and member of the executive and editorial committees of the landmark CRYO-ROP study and PI of the Philadelphia center and worked with Velma Dobson, PhD in the Vision Testing center for ETROP. He served as a member of the original group that developed the International Classification of ROP and recently chaired a “revisiting” of the classification. He has participated in a large number of international conferences and workshops on ROP prevention and treatment in countries with rapidly developing neonatal care systems. Recent work has concentrated on early markers identifying at risk babies and also telemedicine in ROP. Recently, Dr. Quinn served as Principal Investigator and Chair of the multicenter National Eye Institute-funded “Telemedicine Approaches to Evaluating Acute-phase ROP – e-ROP.” This project addressed the very important issue of whether remote evaluation of digital images of eyes of infants at risk for ROP could reliably be detected and referred to an ophthalmologist for an eye examination to determine whether treatment is warranted. The findings have great importance not only in the US, but also in countries where survival of premature infants is increasing, but where ophthalmic expertise may be scarce.

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