Medical Decision Making

How health professionals and patients make treatment decisions, and the barriers to, and facilitators of, effective decision making.

Uptake and Impact of a Clinical Diagnostic Decision Support Tool at an Academic Medical Center

Aug. 24, 2015

John S. Barbieri, Benjamin French, Craig A. Umscheid

In Diagnosis, John Barbieri, Benjamin French and Craig Umscheid investigate whether the use of a differential diagnosis (DDX) generator within a health care system leads to an increase in unnecessary testing and specialty consultation. By providing access to a broad differential, DDX generators can potentially help clinicians overcome cognitive biases by directing them to diagnoses they might not have considered otherwise. However, as the tool suggests numerous potential diagnoses, its use could result in an increase in unnecessary testing and specialty consultation, and...

Variability Among US Intensive Care Units in Managing the Care of Patients Admitted With Preexisting Limits on Life-Sustaining Therapies

Jun. 1, 2015

Joanna Hart, Michael Harhay, Nicole Gabler, Sarah Ratcliffe, Caroline Quill, Scott Halpern

In JAMA Internal Medicine, Scott Halpern and colleagues investigate variance in end-of-life care in intensive care units (ICUs) by looking at a group of patients with presumably similar care preferences. The authors compared the care received at 141 ICUs by patients with pre-existing limits on life-sustaining treatments, and the proportions of such patients who received aggressive care. The care outcomes measured were: provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, new forms of life support, and the addition or removal of treatment limitations. Of the ICU admissions evaluated, 4.8% of...

Suggestibility of Oncologists’ Clinical Estimates

May. 1, 2015

David I. Shalowitz, John O. Schorge

In JAMA Oncology, David Shalowitz and John Schorge (Massachusetts General Hospital), assess the degree to which oncologists’ clinical estimates might be biased by extraneous information. For their study the authors sent surveys of different clinical scenarios to members of the New England and Mid-Atlantic Association of Gynecological Oncologists. Respondents were asked to assess the scenarios and provide an estimated life expectancy, evaluate other providers’ assessments, and indicate what treatments they would opt for. Results of the study show that clinicians are influenced by anchoring...

Predictors of Community Therapists’ Use of Therapy Techniques in a Large Public Mental Health System

Apr. 1, 2015

Rinad S. Beidas, Steven Marcus, Gregory A. Aarons, Kimberly E. Hoagwood, Sonja Schoenwald, Arthur C. Evans, Matthew O. Hurford, Trevor Hadley, Frances K. Barg, Lucia M. Walsh, Danielle R. Adams, David S. Mandell

In JAMA Pediatrics, Rinad Beidas and colleagues explore the effects of individual and organizational characteristics on therapists’ self-reported use of different therapy techniques - cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), family therapy, and psychodynamic therapy techniques. The study focuses on the Philadelphia public mental health system, currently engaged in a large-scale effort to increase the use of CBT. The study results show that although both individual and organizational factors are important, the relative significance of the factors varies by treatment type. Key findings include...

The Use of Health Information Technology to Improve Care and Outcomes for Older Adults

Jan. 18, 2015

Kathryn H. Bowles, Patricia Dykes, George Demiris

In a commentary in Research in Gerontological Nursing, Kathryn Bowles and colleagues look at how nurse scientists are using health information technology, such as electronic health records (EHR) and decision support, to improve care. They highlight positive research findings, including that integrated EHR systems reduced hospital-acquired pressure ulcers by 13 percent. Or how the use of a discharge decision support system helped to identify whether older adults were likely to need post-acute services, such as skilled home care or skilled nursing facility care. Use of the system,...

Digital Marketing to Physicians: Policy Lags Behind Practice

Nov. 12, 2014

In a Perspective in today’s New England Journal of Medicine, David Grande, LDI's Co-Director of Health Policy, and colleagues write about new digital forms of pharmaceutical and medical device marketing to physicians. The same technologies that can be used to support clinical practice—such as electronic health records, social media, and mobile applications—can also be used to conduct market research and to market directly to physicians. Grande and colleagues write:

Pages