Medicare

The federal program that covers medical care for people age 65 or older, younger people with disabilities, and people with End-Stage Renal Disease. Medicare covers about 13% of the US population and makes up a fifth of national health expenditures.

How Nurses Affect Medicare's Hospital Incentive Payments

Nov. 12, 2015

In our last LDI/INQRI Brief, we looked at the evidence of nursing's role in increasing the value of health care, and we pointed out where "value" and "business case" may differ for hospitals. In our latest Brief, we analyze the three Medicare programs designed to align hospital incentives with value, and how nursing-sensitive quality indicators relate to those programs. 

How Nursing Affects Medicare’s Outcome-based Hospital Payments

Data Brief
Nov. 12, 2015

Improving value is one of the central aims of recent and ongoing health care reform. In our last LDI/INQRI Brief, we reviewed the evidence of the role of nurses in increasing the value of health care. In this companion brief, we dig deeper into the three reimbursement strategies that Medicare uses to align hospital financial incentives with quality of care, and we calculate the potential effects of nursing-sensitive quality indicators on hospital payments.

Elimination of cost-sharing and receipt of screening for colorectal and breast cancer

Sep. 17, 2015

Stacey A. Fedewa, Michael Goodman, W. Dana Flanders, Xuesong Han, Robert A. Smith, Elizabeth M. Ward, Chyke A. Doubeni, Ann Goding Sauer, Ahmedin Jemal

In Cancer, Stacey Fedewa and colleagues, including Chyke Doubeni, investigate whether the cost-sharing provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), which aimed to reduce financial barriers for preventive services, affected the prevalence of screening for certain cancers. The research looks specifically at the rates of screening for colorectal cancer and breast cancer among the privately insured and Medicare-enrolled adults of varying socioeconomic status (SES). It uses data from the National Health Interview Survey from 2008 and 2013. The authors find that the rate of screening for...

Who Has The Most To Lose From Health Insurance Mergers?

Jul. 31, 2015

cross-posted with the Field Clinic

In recent weeks, two sets of already huge health insurers—Aetna and Humana, Cigna and Anthem—have announced plans to combine. And more mergers may be in the works.  Should the rest of us fear being trampled when these behemoths connect? The answer to that question, as with almost all questions in health economics, is “it all depends.”

Medicare, Medicaid and the Leonard Davis Institute - Intertwined Legacies

Jul. 24, 2015

Fifty years ago, on July 30, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed Medicare and Medicaid into law. Over the next two years, more than 29 million people gained health coverage through these programs. By 1967, as Alice Rivlin recalls, economists were sounding an alarm about rising Medicare costs and reporting to the President that projected growth would be unsustainable.

Prescription Drug Use under Medicare Part D: A Linear Model of Nonlinear Budget Sets

Feb. 1, 2015

Jason Abaluck, Jonathan Gruber, Ashley Swanson

In a NBER Working Paper, Jason Abaluck (Yale University), Jonathan Gruber (MIT) and LDI’s Ashley Swanson analyze the complicated decision problem faced by Medicare Part D enrollees in their use of prescription drugs. Enrollees must respond to prices that are difficult to find, and that may change as they spend more over time. As in other settings such as income taxation and electricity and cellular telephone markets, these sorts of nonlinear prices make it difficult to estimate behavior, as consumers may not follow rational models of consumption. The authors use Medicare Part D claims data...

Primary Care Shortages: More Than a Head Count

Issue Brief
Nov. 21, 2014

The existence of a primary care physician shortage, even prior to the ACA, is not universally accepted. A new report by the Institute on Medicine found “no credible evidence” that the nation faces a looming physician shortage in primary care specialties. There is greater consensus about a maldistribution of physicians, in terms of specialty, geography, and practice settings. 

Storified! Health Care Reform in 2015

Oct. 11, 2014
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We've gathered a collection of live tweets from our joint PennLDI-Wharton Public Policy Institute event held October 9.  Three panels of researchers and policymakers shared results and insights about how the research could help improve implementation of health care reform. 

Sit back, read more, and enjoy the story!

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