Nursing

The supply, distribution, certifications, and scope of practice of the 2.8 million RNs (including advanced practice RNs) and 690,000 licensed practical nurses currently in practice.

System Redesign and the Health Care Workforce

Oct. 19, 2017

An interdisciplinary panel of experts from health care management, economics, and nursing came together at LDI’s 50th Anniversary Symposium to discuss their perspectives on how “organizational innovation” can be used to redesign health care systems and care delivery.

Moderator:
Linda Aiken, PhD, RN, University of Pennsylvania

Nursing Care Disparities in Neonatal Intensive Care Units

Oct. 11, 2017

Eileen T. Lake, Douglas Straiger, Erika Miles Edwards, Jessica G. Smith, Jeannette A. Rogowski

In Health Services Research, Eileen Lake and colleagues, including Jessica Smith and Jeannette Rogowski, compared missed nursing care for infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across hospitals with a predominantly-black versus non-black patient population. The authors sought to understand the factors that cause nurses to miss care. At sites across four states, NICU nurses completed a survey on the floor’s average patient load, nursing environment, and nursing professional characteristics, as well as their individual patient load and the care that they missed on their...

Post-operative mortality, missed care and nurse staffing in nine countries: A cross-sectional study

Aug. 28, 2017

Jane E. Ball, Luk Bruyneel, Linda H. Aiken, Walter Sermeus, Douglas M. Sloane, Anne Marie Rafferty, Rikard Lindqvist, Carol Tishelman, Peter Griffiths, RN4CAST Consortium

In International Journal of Nursing Studies, Jane Ball and colleagues, including Linda Aiken, examine if missed nursing care explains the observed association between nurse staffing levels and mortality. Previous research has shown that higher postoperative mortality rates are associated with lower nurse staffing levels. When nurse staffing levels are lower, there is a higher incidence of necessary but missed nursing care. The authors collected data from 422,730 patients from 300 general acute hospitals, and administered surveys to 26,516 registered nurses to understand staffing...

Structural, Nursing, and Physician Characteristics and 30-Day Mortality for Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery in Pennsylvania

Research Brief
Jul. 27, 2017

This study finds no relationship between mortality and cardiac ICU organizational factors, such as presence of daytime or nighttime intensivists, nurse ICU experience, or presence of interns or residents.

Video Analysis of Factors Associated With Response Time to Physiologic Monitor Alarms in a Children’s Hospital

Jul. 11, 2017

Christopher P. Bonafide, A. Russell Localio, John H. Holmes, Vinay M. Nadkarni, Shannon Stemler, Matthew MacMurchy, Miriam Zander, Kathryn E. Roberts, Richard Lin, Ron Keren

In JAMA Pediatrics, Christopher Bonafide and colleagues, including John Holmes and Ron Keren, seek to identify factors associated with nurses' response time to physiologic monitor alarms at the bedside. As nurse response time to bed alarms remains slow, the authors examine patient- and nurse-related factors that affect responses to alarms. The authors video recorded 551 hours of care administered by 38 nurses to 100 children. They find several variables that shorten nurses’ response time to alarms. These include if the patient was on complex care service, if family members were...

Components of Comprehensive and Effective Transitional Care

Jul. 10, 2017

Mary D. Naylor, Elizabeth C. Shaid, Deborah Carpenter, Brianna Gass, Carol Levine, Jing Li, Ann Malley, Kathleen Mccauley, Huong Q. Nguyen, Heather Watson, Jane Brock, Brian Mittman, Brian Jack, Suzanne Mitchell, Becky Callicoatte, John Schall, Mark V. Williams

In Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Mary Naylor and colleagues identify components of the Transitional Care model that provide the desired patient and caregiver outcomes. For decades, the Transitional Care (TC) model has worked to prevent re-hospitalizations and their associated costs, however little is known about the specific factors that make TC effective. The authors formed a workgroup to identify a preliminary set of components. The workgroup conducted focus groups and interviews with patients and caregivers, and created an advisory group comprised of patient and...

Nurses’ Perceptions of In-Hospital Versus Telephone Availability of an Intensivist at Night in an Intensive Care Unit

Jul. 10, 2017

Emily S. Stanton, Cary Hilbert, Stephanie Maillie, Jessica Dine, Scott D. Halpern, and Meeta Prasad Kerlin

In American Journal of Critical Care, Emily Stanton and colleagues, including Jessica Dine, Scott Halpern, and Meeta Prasad Kerlin, investigate nurses' perceptions about nighttime intensivist staffing. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews of 13 night-shift nurses in an academic medical intensive care unit to elicit perceptions of nighttime staffing with attending intensivists, versus residents with attending intensivists on call remotely. Eight themes emerged from these interviews: efficiency, communication, job place comfort, quality of patient care, procedures,...

Nursing skill mix in European hospitals: cross-sectional study of the association with mortality, patient ratings, and quality of care

Jul. 10, 2017

Linda H. Aiken, Douglas Sloane, Peter Griffiths, Anne Marie Rafferty, Luk Bruyneel, Matthew McHugh, Claudia B. Maier, Teresa Moreno-Casbas, Jane E. Ball, Dietmar Ausserhofer, Walter Sermeus

In BMJ Quality & Safety, Linda Aiken and colleagues, including Matthew McHugh examine the association of hospital nursing skill mix with patient mortality, patient ratings of care, and indicators of quality care among European hospitals. As policymakers around the world seek to reduce health spending, a popular target in Europe has been to transition from more professional nurses to fewer high-cost nurses supported by more lower-wage assistants. The authors analyzed how nursing skill mix affects indicators of quality patient care. The authors utilized cross-sectional patient...

Coercion or Caring: The Fundamental Paradox for Adherence Interventions for HIV+ People With Mental Illness

Jul. 3, 2017

Marlene M. Eisenberg, Michael Hennessy, Donna Coviello, Nancy Hanrahan, Michael B. Blank

In AIDS and Behavior, Marlene Eisenberg and colleagues, including Nancy Hanrahan and Michael Blank, examine if a high-intensity HIV-treatment intervention would be perceived as coercive by HIV-positive individuals with serious mental illness. Previous research has shown that potentially coercive mandates during the earliest stages of mental health treatment are associated with later treatment benefits. Furthermore, the prevalence of HIV is significantly higher among populations with mental illness. The authors developed an HIV management regimen that utilized advance practice...

Sustained improvement in intraoperative efficiency following implementation of a dedicated surgical team for pediatric spine fusion surgery

Jun. 22, 2017

Wallis Muhly, John McCloskey, Jeff Feldman, Barbara Dezayas, Michael Blum, Blair Kraus, Vaidehi Mehta, Devika Singh, Ron Keren, John Flynn

In Perioperative Care and Operating Room Management, Wallis Muhly, Ron Keren, and colleagues assess if dedicated surgical teams can improve and sustain intraoperative efficiency for pediatric posterior spine fusion (PSF). The authors compared OR efficiency data and total time spent in the OR before and after adoption of a dedicated surgical team model. The quality improvement model including developing a multidisciplinary team of surgeons, anesthesiologists nurses, and technicians, structuring weekly team meetings to understand and map the OR process, and identifying areas where...

Nursing leading change to advance health

Jun. 22, 2017

Patricia Polansky, Mary Sue Gorski, Alexia Green, G. Adriana Perez, Robert P. Wise

In Nursing Outlook, Patricia Polansky and colleagues, including Adriana Perez, review current and previous leadership initiatives to increase the number of nurse leaders in health- and health care-related boardrooms. The authors discuss the lack of nurse leaders who are involved in boardroom service, and review efforts that have been made to increase the number of nurses in boardrooms. They focus on three main themes – “Step up and Lead”, “Get a Seat at the Table”, and “Support and Leverage Board Service”, and stress the importance of a clear action plan to elevate nurse...

Missed Nursing Care in Pediatrics

Jun. 19, 2017

Eileen T. Lake, Pamela B. de Cordova, Sharon Barton, Shweta Singh, Paula D. Agosto, Beth Ely, Kathryn E. Roberts, Linda H. Aiken

In Hospital Pediatrics, Eileen Lake and colleagues, including Shweta Singh and Linda Aiken, examine patterns of missed nursing care in inpatient pediatric settings to determine whether it is associated with unfavorable work environments and high nurse workloads. The authors used registered nurse data from over 200 pediatric hospitals. The data shows that nurses reported missed care on their last shift for twelve nursing activities due to time constraints. More than half of pediatric nurses missed care on their previous shift, and missed care was more prevalent in poor work...

Creating an Evidence-Based Progression for Clinical Advancement Programs

Jun. 19, 2017

Kathleen G. Burke, Tonya Johnson, Christine Sites, Jane Barnsteiner 

In American Journal of Nursing, Kathleen Burke and colleagues validate core competencies and knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) that were previously developed for professional nursing practice. The researchers then assess the integration and progression of these competencies in clinical advancement programs. Clinical experts from 13 Magnet hospitals participated in quality improvement rounds aimed at reaching consensus on how much the KSAs have been incorporated into clinical advancement. The group found that all of the core competencies assessed were essential at all levels...

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