LDI Briefs

Association of Patient Out-of-Pocket Costs With Prescription Abandonment and Delay in Fills of Novel Oral Anticancer Agents

Research Brief
Jan. 19, 2018

High out-of-pocket (OOP) costs may limit access to novel oral cancer medications. In a retrospective study, nearly one third of patients whose OOP costs were $100 to $500 and nearly half of patients whose OOP costs were more than $2,000 failed to pick up their new prescription for an oral cancer medication, compared to 10% of patients who were required to pay less than $10 at the time of purchase. Delays in picking up prescriptions were also more frequent among patients facing higher OOP costs. 

Physicians and Advanced Practitioners Specializing in Nursing Home Care, 2012-2015

Research Brief
Nov. 29, 2017

The number of clinicians specializing in nursing home care increased by 33.7% from 2012 to 2015, although nursing home specialists made up only 21% of nursing home clinicians in 2015. Most of these specialists were advanced practitioners (physician assistants and nurse practitioners) delivering post-acute care. The change in number of nursing home specialists varied significantly by geographic region.

Exploring the Decline of Narrow Networks on the ACA Marketplaces in 2017

Issue Brief
Nov. 6, 2017

The prevalence of narrow provider networks on the ACA Marketplace is trending down. In 2017, 21% of plans had narrow networks, down from 25% in 2016. The largest single factor was that 70% of plans from National carriers exited the market and these plans had narrower networks than returning plans. Exits account for more than half of the decline in the prevalence of narrow networks, with the rest attributed to broadening networks among stable plans, particularly among Blues carriers. The narrow network strategy is expanding among traditional Medicaid carriers and remains steady among provider-based carriers and regional/local carriers.

Narrow Networks on the Individual Marketplace in 2017

Issue Brief
Sep. 14, 2017

This Issue Brief describes the breadth of physician networks on the ACA marketplaces in 2017. We find that the overall rate of narrow networks is 21%, which is a decline since 2014 (31%) and 2016 (25%). Narrow networks are concentrated in plans sold on state-based marketplaces, at 42%, compared to 10% of plans on federally-facilitated marketplaces. Issuers that have traditionally offered Medicaid coverage have the highest prevalence of narrow network plans at 36%, with regional/local plans and provider-based plans close behind at 27% and 30%. We also find large differences in narrow networks by state and by plan type. 

Stabilizing Individual Health Insurance Markets With Subsidized Reinsurance

Issue Brief
Sep. 11, 2017

Subsidized reinsurance represents a potentially important tool to help stabilize individual health insurance markets. This brief describes alternative forms of subsidized reinsurance and the mechanisms by which they spread risk and reduce premiums. It summarizes specific state initiatives and Congressional proposals that include subsidized reinsurance. It compares approaches to each other and to more direct subsidies of individual market enrollment. For a given amount of funding, a particular program’s efficacy will depend on how it affects insurers’ risk and the risk margins built into premiums, incentives for selecting or avoiding risks, incentives for coordinating and managing care, and the costs and complexity of administration. These effects warrant careful consideration by policymakers as they consider measures to achieve stability in the individual market in the long term.

Networks in ACA Marketplaces are Narrower for Mental Health Care Than for Primary Care

Research Brief
Sep. 5, 2017

In 2016, ACA marketplace plans offered provider networks that were far narrower for mental health care than for primary care. On average, plan networks included 24 percent of all primary care providers and 11 percent of all mental health care providers in a given market. Just 43 percent of psychiatrists and 19 percent of nonphysician mental health providers participate in any network. These findings raise important questions about network sufficiency, consumer choice, and access to mental health care in marketplace plans.

Community Health Worker Support For Disadvantaged Patients With Multiple Chronic Diseases: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Research Brief
Aug. 21, 2017

Community health worker interventions hold promise for improving outcomes of low-income patients with multiple chronic diseases.

Substance Use Disorder in America: Research to Practice, and Back Again

Issue Brief
Aug. 3, 2017

These proceedings summarize the insights shared by nationally renowned panels of experts and overall themes discussed throughout the conference. The conference included experts from academia and public and private sectors, who came together to discuss the gaps in evidence-based substance use policy and practice, with particular emphasis on the opioid epidemic. The conference concluded with an interactive session focused on the exchange of ideas and solutions to curb the opioid epidemic​. Those ideas are included here.  

Structural, Nursing, and Physician Characteristics and 30-Day Mortality for Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery in Pennsylvania

Research Brief
Jul. 27, 2017

This study finds no relationship between mortality and cardiac ICU organizational factors, such as presence of daytime or nighttime intensivists, nurse ICU experience, or presence of interns or residents.

Effect of a Price Transparency Intervention in the Electronic Health Record on Clinician Ordering of Inpatient Laboratory Tests

Research Brief
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May. 19, 2017

In this randomized clinical trial, clinicians did not change their ordering of inpatient lab tests when Medicare allowable fees were displayed in the electronic health record at the time of order entry.
 

Hospital Readmission and Social Risk Factors Identified from Physician Notes

Research Brief
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May. 4, 2017

This study finds that automated methods for analyzing physician notes within electronic health records can identify social risk factors more completely than administrative data, enhancing a hospital’s ability to identify patients at risk of readmission.

Evaluating the Impact of the Laborist Model of Obstetric Care on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

Research Brief
Apr. 26, 2017

Implementation of the laborist model was associated with a 15% decrease in the odds of the induction of labor and a 17% decrease in the odds of preterm birth.

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