Roshie Xing

Roshie Xing is a rising second-year student at the University of Pennsylvania studying Mathematical Economics in the College of Arts and Sciences. She intends to pursue a PhD in Economics to contribute to research on and eventually inform public policy efforts to reduce wealth concentration and socio-economic inequality. She looks forward to exploring some of these issues in the context of the health care sector this summer and having the chance to better define her long-term research interests.

Her interest in the intersections of health care and inequality first developed when she volunteered as a student advocate for Save the Children Action Network. In her preparation to lobby for a bill scaling up US involvement in the fight to end preventable maternal, newborn, and child deaths globally, she realized both the extent of the crisis and the lack of awareness around the issue. Since then, Wu has continued to read and inform herself about the health care disparities both in the US and around the world, following closely recent debates about achieving universal access to affordable and quality healthcare in the US and the struggle to prevent the phenomenon of Americans delaying or going without critical medical tests and treatments to avoid astronomical bills. She is particularly interested in seeing whether the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exposed many of the existing cracks within the American healthcare and economic infrastructure, will lead to structural changes that will result in a more compassionate system that prioritizes workers and families.

During SUMR, Xing is working on two projects. She is spending half of her time working with Dr. Juan Pablo Atal on a project studying the influences of colonial heritage and culture, as well as health care access and quality, on fertility and children’s health in Africa. Her second project is with Dr. Atul Gupta on the effects of vertical and horizontal mergers among healthcare providers on patient care and patient health outcomes, hoping to inform the debate on whether consolidation advocates’ claims of greater efficiency and quality have merit.

Outside of her research, Xing finds peace in playing the flute as a member of Penn Flutes and the Penn Wind Ensemble, is a contributor and poetry editor for Penn’s feminist magazine The F-Word Magazine, and is a member of the Undergraduate Economics Society. In her free time, she loves to read, write poetry, passionately debate politics and current events, and goof around with her friends and family.